Archive for February, 2009

People experience themselves and the world they live in through the five senses or modalities – seeing, hearing, feeling, smelling and tasting. These senses or representational Systems are also the way that people encode, organise, store and derive the meaning of things that come into their brain from the outside world.

The brain translates these sensory inputs into the corresponding sensory representations or maps that create a likeness or a synthesis of our original perceptions. As such, they create our own personal map of reality that we store in our brain in the same way that a mapmaker creates a simplified representation of the physical territory described. As Richard Bandler says, “the map is not the territory” – one of the precepts of NLP.

In encoding this information in our brains we don’t just use the five sensory modalities or representational systems …
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People tend to get on better with people who act like they do. As a result, they tend to work better together, communicate well and end up liking each other. We call the result rapport and the basic rapport building mechanism we call matching.

We refer to the ongoing process of matching as pacing – you move as the client moves, matching her sequence of movements and making her feel comfortable, at ease and on the same wavelength as you. This also applies to her …
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Virginia Satir was a world-renowned family therapist for forty-five years until her death in1988. She dedicated her life to helping people grow and heal and is recognised by many as “one of the most influential modern psychologists and a founder of family therapy.”

As a therapist she developed process-oriented systems to lead people to tap into their internal resources to create external changes. She believed that people’s internal view of themselves, their sense of self-worth and self-esteem, was the underlying root of their problems. She based her techniques and processes around looking clearly and congruently inward at oneself to view how we originally learned to cope with our world. She believed that the problem was not the problem but how one coped with the problem was the problem. Satir developed and named four stances for viewing how one copes or originally learned to survive …
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Categories : Other Psychology
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An anchor in NLP is a stimulus fired off by one or more simultaneous trigger signals using one or more of the 5 representational systems – visual, auditory, kinaesthetic, gustatory and olfactory. When fired, an anchor triggers a set of memories and the associated feelings, states, behaviours, reflex actions and unconscious programmes that were happening at the time the anchor was set.

A good example of Anchors in my own life comes from my late teenage years, when I went through a sad, lonely and confused phase. The feelings were strongest when I regularly walked along a sea wall on the East Coast quietly humming the latest Beatles record – Hey Jude. The whole repeated experience strongly anchored those memories to the song, the location, the feelings, the smell of the sea, the plants along the walk, the sounds of the boats, etc. Now 40 year’s later, the whole scene, the emotional feelings, all the smells, sounds, images and my state return whenever I experience one or more of those sensations. Sometimes it’s a mixed feeling, when one of the stimuli fires of another memory. If I hear the Hey Jude song, I get those sad feelings mixed with the pleasure of growing up in the 60’s and all those wonderful Beatles songs.

If these anchors can be set up automatically, as in the example above, I can set up anchors deliberately …
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I am considering using this technique with Frank, a friend with a fear of flying. He assures me that it is not an all out phobia, as he flies when he really has to for business and very occasionally for urgent social events. His wife tells me that his fear of flying severely restricts their holiday options. If it was a full-on phobia, I would not get him to recall the experience in the way I have outlined below. Frank is eager to be a case study for me.

Identifying Frank’s Strategies
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Feb
06

Firework Induction

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Note: Make sure that the client is neither uncomfortable nor called Catherine, before using this induction!

Make yourself comfortable now; with both feet flat on the ground and just separate your hands, hands apart left and right. And let them lie loosely on your legs or on the arms of your chair. It’s better if your legs are uncrossed, but it doesn’t matter if you feel the need to move slightly, now and again. You don’t have to be absolutely still. You’re feeling comfortable now …
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Feb
06

Hypnosis Pre-Talk

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Before you first experience hypnosis and start using it to make wonderful, beneficial changes in your life, I would like to say a few words to answer some of your possible questions and to dispel a few popular myths and misconceptions you possibly have about hypnosis.

One very common idea that people have is that being in hypnosis is the same as being unconscious, but that wouldn’t work, even I it was acceptable, as I need to communicate with your subconscious or unconscious mind to help you achieve anything from hypnosis. That wouldn’t be possible if you were out cold!

My own first experience of hypnosis was one of being extremely relaxed and calm, but aware …
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Categories : Hypnosis
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Above all, you must make the therapy room congruent with the therapist and comfortable for the client. You need to provide a hypnotic environment and create a soothing calming influence on the client. Have as few as possible outside or negative influences affecting any of the senses in the interior of the room or in any external view visible to the client.

Don’t allow any interruptions and turn off any phone in the room, including your and you client’s mobile, prior to any client session. Set up an appropriate signalling mechanism with the secretarial services.

Choose an adequately large room that’s reasonably soundproofed and maintain it at a comfortable temperature. Keep pictures to a minimum with generally comfortable images carrying little or no message that the client could pick up inadvertently. Display a small number of certificates and some relevant reference books in a bookcase or on a shelf, just to support your …
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Categories : Hypnosis, NLP
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Hypnotism as a health aid probably originated with the Hindus of India and they mention hypnotic procedures in the Hindu Vedas written around 1500 BC. Historians believe that they operated sleep temples, like the ancient Greeks and Egyptians around 500 BC, where they gave hypnotic-like inductions and suggestions to sick people to utilise a sleep-like state. In China, Wong Tai wrote about the medical use of incantations and hand passes, around 2600 BC.

There is also evidence that people practiced hypnosis in some form more widely across the Europe and Asia in theses times. There are also earlier cave paintings suggesting trance-like practices taking place at least 6,000 years ago.

The Middle Ages

Modern science evolved rapidly between the 9th and 14th centuries across the Mediterranean. This also led to a revival of the medical and philosophical knowledge from Ancient Greece, Egypt and early Eastern civilisations. This included their development of a deeper understanding of psychology …
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Categories : Hypnosis, NLP, Self Hypnosis
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