Archive for March, 2009

Now I’m confused about golf practice and just how much leads to better golf. More importantly, just how much is good for golf improvement? I’m confused because I keep getting contradictory advice from the books I’m reading, TV programs I’m viewing and the stuff I’m browsing on the web.

As a low handicap golfer for over 40 years, I’ve done a fair bit of work on the practice ground and had lots of golf lessons from lots of good coaches – some of the best in the world in their day. However, I know that much of the technical advice I received left me confused and inconsistent …
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Giving my clients homework tasks to improve their golf and get the most effective results from golf hypnosis sessions is one of the keys to my success. It’s also something that I use to good effect with my clinical hypnotherapy clients as well. Homework can also be used very effectively with golf hypnosis recordings and with self-assigned tasks for self-hypnosis as well.

So what do I mean by Golf Hypnosis Homework

Well don’t worry; it’s not like going back to school. This homework is often just a task that changes your routine or increases your awareness of something you do …
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When people write about the top professionals, they tend to talk about the externally visible aspect of their game – their swing technique. Those same writers rarely tell you about the golf mind golf secrets of those same professionals.

So what about Jack Nicklaus and 90% of golf in the mind?

When I started out in golf in the late 60’s I recall hearing Jack Nicklaus talk on TV about golf being 90% in the mind. However, when I eagerly read his first book, The Greatest Game of All published in 1969, I found very little information about golf psychology. In fact, two thirds of the book was biographical and the remaining third was about the golf swing. Maybe that was what the public wanted to hear or what Herbert Warren Wind, his co-writer, wanted to write about …
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You do not improve your swing and achieve golf success through analysis paralysis. People who teach complex swing thoughts just clutter the conscious mind and block out the unconscious mental processes that just know how to swing the club to the best of a player’s ability.

Now don’t get me wrong about the general standard of teaching from PGA golf professionals, it’s truly magnificent and in nearly always cases their swing coaching advice is well thought out, simple, elegant and tailored to the golfer in front of them.

So what am I griping about, you may ask? …
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I read about so many expert golfers and golf experts – not always the same people – imploring us that golf is a mental game. Yet only a select band of golfers use any form of golf psychology assistance to improve their game. Now, I know you do, otherwise you wouldn’t be reading this on a golf hypnosis website.

Let’s hear what a few of those experts say, beginning with my favourite golfer and ending with one from Bobby Jones …
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Have you noticed how much better golf you play after a good night’s sleep? Well I hadn’t, but a couple of articles I read recently made me think about it more closely. And yes I think that’s right.

Now one of the beneficial side effects of almost every hypnotherapy session is that the client reports sleeping better afterwards. What’s more, my clients also tell me that they wake up on time, feeling refreshed and eager for the day ahead. This seems to happen whatever we’re working on. And that includes golf hypnosis …
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You don’t have to be a “bird-brain” to be a good putter and a consistent golfer, but in this case it helps. AJ the parrot even has his own golf bag.

The golf demonstration starts 40 seconds into the action, but the rest is worth watching too.

This clip just amused me so much that I just had to include it in my blog.

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Categories : Andrew's Antics
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I was working with a client recently who wanted golf improvement without formal hypnosis for a destructive problem he had when playing golf. Let’s call him Alan for the sake of client confidentiality. I’ve changed a few other details as well for the same reason. Alan’s an enthusiast at everything he does – from work to golf to family. The priority sequence changes, but the enthusiasm’s consistent across all three. He’s also as honest and true to his friends as the day is long.

So let’s focus on golf. Well Alan’s a hard-working golfer, practising or playing most days, somehow. He has a good swing, is excellent around the greens and is an instinctively superb putter. He’s good at visualisation as well and practices stepping into the shoes of his golfing heroes. He often practices on his own with two balls – one played in his mind by Tiger Woods and the other by Jack Nicklaus. He also works hard on his physical fitness with long cross-country walks and almost daily workouts in the pool – whatever the weather.

Alan’s problem in golf is that he consistently scores much worse than he should due to unforced errors – accidents you could say …
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How much do you berate yourself when you play a bad shot at golf? If you’re a typical golfer the answer is pretty badly! In fact, you probably use language that you’d never use in public. It’s a good thing that you save the worst things for expression privately in your head. Just imagine how you would feel if your fourball or foursome partner said the same things to you after you hit a bad shot. You’d be horrified and you’d probably make a mental note never to play with them again.

What’s possibly worse is that many players have similar negative internal dialogue whenever they plan and execute a shot. They recall all the bad shots they’ve ever hit in this situation and focus more on what can go wrong than on what they’re trying to do …
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Now I’m really looking forward to some unconscious golf at Doral over the weekend, but I’m not sure what sort of spectacle it’s going to be with players like Mike Weir allegedly “going unconscious” – doesn’t sound like a lot of action there.

To be fair, the article I’ve just read from Lorne Rubenstein at Globe and Mail talks about the advice that Bob Rotella is giving Mike Weir in preparation for this weekend’s World Golf Championships. And any advice from Bob is usually good advice. You can read Lorne’s article at “Trying to ‘go unconscious’ on the course”

I talk a lot in my golf hypnosis work about the difference between the conscious and the unconscious mind in my work and I truly believe that better golf is played in the unconscious mind – by being in the zone, as it’s more commonly called. …
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